Making Sense of Life and Death

 

Making sense of life and death is the foundation or container for all pragmatic end-of-life planning. This learning area helps people explore the reality of their mortality, refine end-of-life planning priorities, name core values and articulate hopes and fears for their inevitable death, dying and after-death care.

 

Interested in offering a workshop around Making Sense of Life and Death? Contact Brittany today!

 

 

The inevitability of death is the one thing in life we’re certain about, yet most people would do anything to avoid talking or even thinking about it. It’s certain your future will include death, after-death care (including how you’ll be laid to rest), and the settling of your estate, regardless of its size. It’s possible that your future will include disability, serious illness, sudden death, a funeral or ceremony of some kind and the gifting or distribution of your financial assets and precious possessions.

 

What is holding you back from being more prepared? Devoting time and energy to consider and plan ahead for your future —including your inevitable death—will change how you die and how you live, right here, right now, and for the rest of your life. .

 

 

Many of us know the benefits of preparing for our one-day, some-day death. But sometimes it’s hard to get started. All this planning-ahead business feels overwhelming and fragmented. Or perhaps some basic planning pieces are in place but it feels like your planning documents don’t reflect your true essence.

 

Based on three tools from Willow’s holistic and pragmatic workbook, 7 Tools for Making Sense of Life & Death, Values, Wishes and Who and What Matter Most will guide you to explore the reality of your mortality in a fun and interactive workshop. Making sense of life and death before making practical arrangements will ensure that your end-of-life planning reflects your values and priorities. Whether you have days or decades left to live, thinking about and preparing for your death will inspire you to live your best life now.

 

 

Either consciously or unconsciously, our past informs our present. Your previous experiences with illness, dying, death, grief, and how someone was cared for after they died—including any planning that was or wasn’t in place—have undoubtedly shaped your personal desires and informed your sense of what’s possible and what’s not. We all have hopes and fears about what might happen (to us and/or the people we leave behind) in the time leading up to our death, at the moment of our death, and after we die.

 

Based on three tools from Willow’s holistic and pragmatic workbook, 7 Tools for Making Sense of Life & Death, Conscious Health, Personal Care and Final Wishes will ensure that your choices around end-of-life planning reflects your values and priorities. Whether you have days or decades to live, thinking about and preparing for your death will change how you die and inspire you to live your best life now.